Viewing entries tagged
relationships

7 Ways To Build Customer Confidence and Obtain Referrals

7 Ways To Build Customer Confidence and Obtain Referrals

We all have instincts that make us feel receptive to a product or turn us away from an offer. The question is WHY we feel the way we do. 

Developing healthy relationships is necessary for life, but it is not easy. Diverse backgrounds contribute to the complexity of a situation, but everyone is human. The phrase, “treat people the way you would like to be treated” sounds cliche but transcends cultural boundaries. Think about your last positive and negative interaction with someone. Why did you feel that way? 

After countless meetings as a client and with clients, I have identified seven attributes that have enriched my personal life and have helped me build effective relationships. The common factor among the seven = respecting and valuing TIME, our most precious commodity.


1. Confidence: I always do my homework before speaking with a client by researching pertinent topics and reading articles that relate to the topic of interest. The information from my research is used to ask my client informed follow-up questions. In return, I expect to receive responses that will help me tailor my implementation plan. By asking thoughtful questions, my clients trust that I can get the job done because I have taken time to understand their situation. 


2. Trust: Trust is developed through responsive interaction and intuition. I listen to my clients' needs before providing a response or interjecting my perspective. Honest and constructive feedback is provided as necessary, and I take client confidentiality very seriously. Gossiping about someone or something is bad practice, can damage your reputation, and is a waste of time. 


3. Honesty: I ask for clarification or provide my interpretation of the issue if I do not fully understand the clients' perspective. When I am not familiar with a topic, I admit it. Pretending to sound intelligent about something out of my purview tends to have a negative effect on the quality of my product and with relationships moving forward. 


4. Respect: I typically begin initial email exchanges by writing, " Dear Mr./Ms.," or "Hello Mr./Ms.," if I do not know the person. Similarly, I may call someone Mr. or Ms. depending on the context of the situation. Earning respect takes time, but addressing your client with his/her proper title will only help your situation. 


5. My client is my priority: Regardless of my schedule, I always give 100% of my attention to a client meeting whether it is in person or over the phone. They need to feel like they are #1, because they are.  

Tip: Never tell your client, “It’s been so long since we talked, and I haven’t looked at your file in a while.” I have had some people say that to me in the past, and they are automatically red flagged on my list of referrals. 


6. Punctuality: Time is valuable commodity. I cannot stress this enough. If I attend a meeting in person, I estimate the amount of time it will take to arrive, and I take unforeseen traffic delays into account. If I am late, I notify my client as soon as possible. Generally speaking, I try not to postpone meetings more than two times.   


7. Mind My Manners: I put myself on mute when I am on a call so the sound of keyboard strokes do not interrupt the flow of conversation. When I meet with people in person, my phone is placed on silent in my bag, I have a notebook out, and I make appropriate eye contact with the person who is speaking. Each situation varies, and observing social cues are critical to building client confidence and trust. 

Take these seven attributes into account the next time you are receiving services, or you are scheduling a meeting with a client regardless cultural background. Paying attention to these mannerisms have saved me a substantial amount of time and I have gained a reputation that reflects my persona.

When in doubt, ask yourself how you would like to be treated, and treat your client with equal respect. 

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Why Partner Travel is the Next Big Thing

Why Partner Travel is the Next Big Thing

I lived the single girl dream. I had studied abroad in college, lived in various cities, and traveled on my own. I was – and still am – a HUGE proponent of single girl travel. With the world becoming more connected and easier to travel with apps and wifi almost everywhere, there’s no reason why anyone should deny themselves the gift of solo travel.

But all that changed when in December 2013, while traveling with Under30Experiences in Nicaragua, I met my now husband.  Falling in love with another traveler awarded us the opportunity to build our travel lifestyle together. In addition to various one off trips, we’ve lived in Costa Rica, got married in Nicaragua, and are now backpacking our way across Southeast Asia.

To say traveling with your partner is the best thing in the world is an understatement. Here are five reasons why:

1. Breaking Comfort Zones: It’s no secret that travel of any sorts pushes you outside of your comfort zone. But traveling with a partner brings it to a whole new level. When you travel with your partner, you find that you are willing to take steps outside your comfort zone that you may not have been able to do alone. Knowing you’re going to be caught no matter what and celebrating together after one of you conquers a fear? Priceless.

OVERCOMING MY FEAR OF ZIP LINING IN COSTA RICA

OVERCOMING MY FEAR OF ZIP LINING IN COSTA RICA

 

2. Experiencing Moments: Watching the sun set over the Indian Ocean with my husband is one of the most special memories I hold in my heart. Traveling with your partner provides you with experiences you otherwise would never have. You are sharing moments that you simply can’t describe to others, that you two alone own. You understand the impact on the other person without ever having to express one word. 

RICH IN EXPERIENCES - WATCHING THE SUN SET IN BALI 

RICH IN EXPERIENCES - WATCHING THE SUN SET IN BALI 

 

3. Learning About Each Other’s (Not so Wonderful) Qualities: Traveling with a partner teaches you more about one another than just living together does. My husband has learned that I require plans and will read 100 reviews before I settle on something and I have learned that he is content just going with flow. This spills over into other aspects of our relationship. When dealing with differences on the road, you have to face them – together. You only have each other so if you’re mad or annoyed, you better get over it fast. 

 

4. Creating Space Together: Traveling is exhausting – mentally, emotionally, and physically. As such, it’s important for travelers to create space for the mind, body, and spirit to decompress and rest. While we may be sharing a small AirBnb room, giving each other the space we both need to read, write, exercise, and rest is critical to ensure the long stretches on the road. Being able to selflessly give that space to your partner is truly a life skill.

GLACIER HIKING IN ICELAND

GLACIER HIKING IN ICELAND

 

5. Being Home is a State of Mind: Traveling with your parents makes you realize what’s important from the start. For us its actively listening, encouragement, giving each other the space to grow, patience, and always coming from a place of love. It’s the foundation of everything we do. It doesn’t matter if we are traveling or spending a week at home base; home is a state of being with the one you love.

Are you and your partner living a travel lifestyle or are thinking about traveling soon? I’d love to hear your perspective about partner travel.

HOME IS WHERE YOU MAKE IT - RANCHO MARGOT, COSTA RICA

HOME IS WHERE YOU MAKE IT - RANCHO MARGOT, COSTA RICA

 

This piece was written by Travel Expert, Jennifer DeSimone.  Reach out to Jennifer via Facebook or via email at Jennifer@theartofintentions

Should You Go On That Trip With Your Beau, Friends, Or Solo?

Should You Go On That Trip With Your Beau, Friends, Or Solo?

Let's face it, planning and booking a trip anywhere can be exciting and scary at the same time. The thrill of exploration is fun, but it can also be bogged down by the unknown. There are many things out of our control, but you CAN control your travel companion(s). Our team is here to help you think through your decision making process so everyone is happy in the end. 

Here are five questions you need to ask yourself. 

1. What is the purpose of your trip? The kind of companion you want to travel with or without will depend on the nature of your trip. If it's for work or professional development purposes you may want to go with colleagues. If you are traveling for leisure, your travel companion will depend on the memories you would like to make. OR Maybe you just need to hit the reset button and go on a solo journey. 

1. TRIPS SHOULD BE FUN

1. TRIPS SHOULD BE FUN

 

2. What kind of expectations do you have for your trip? The right companion will depend on what you may need from them. If you are going for work, perhaps you need a mentor-like figure to guide you. If you are going for leisure, you may want to be around someone that makes you laugh or helps to give you a richer perspective on life. 

2. SET POSITIVE EXPECTATIONS FOR YOUR TRIP

2. SET POSITIVE EXPECTATIONS FOR YOUR TRIP

 

3. Do you want to share these memories with your beau, be solo, or with a group of old friends? Be honest with yourself and think about what you need out of this experience. You want to look back at the time spent on this trip with a smile. 

3. WHO DO YOU WANT TO CREATE MEMORIES WITH?

3. WHO DO YOU WANT TO CREATE MEMORIES WITH?

 

4. If it's not a solo trip, do you love the people you will be traveling with? You may not have the option of choosing work companions, but you may have a little more leeway choosing leisure companions. Some of your best friends may not be your favorite travel buddies. 

4. MAKE SURE YOU LOVE THE PEOPLE YOU ARE TRAVELING WITH

4. MAKE SURE YOU LOVE THE PEOPLE YOU ARE TRAVELING WITH

 

5. What was your state of mind when planning the trip? Your mood factors into the kind of trip you will want to experience. If you are grieving, you may want a quick get away. If you are stressed, you may want to go on a retreat. If you just had a break up, you may want to experience an 'Eat Love Pray' moment. You understand my point.

Be aware that you mood may change; so if you plan your trip way in advance you may not want to take that trip anymore. It's okay to change your plans, but be mindful of your travel companions. It is unfair if your cancellation disrupts plans for your friends.  

5. BE MINDFUL OF YOUR STATE OF MIND WHEN PLANNING A TRIP!

5. BE MINDFUL OF YOUR STATE OF MIND WHEN PLANNING A TRIP!

 

AND REMEMBER: This assessment will only work if you are honest with yourself!